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Difference between Yellows and 8610

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  • Difference between Yellows and 8610

    The 8610 shares the same digressive curve of the 8611, but with preset compression. The Yellows are great struts/shocks but don't have capability to run as heavy of a spring as most that are serious want. The Yellow has a digressive curve, but it's not nearly as digressive as the 86** series. The shaft is larger on the 86** as well, iirc. The other downside to the Yellows is the hub flange on the stock strut does not have sufficient clearance to the wheel for a typical wide wheel stance. So you'll be subject to running lower offsets for each width of wheel as well. You can cut off the factory flange and weld on a new, but by that time you may as well have just picked up the custom housing for the 86** series.
    Between rides...unless you count a WD21...


  • #2
    Difference between Yellows and 8610

    I haven't really been able to find many specifics about the differences between these dampers. With the relatively high cost of the custom housings, the 8610 setup ends up costing quite a bit more than just going with Yellows, although the 8610 dampers themselves don't seem to cost much more than Yellows. I know both are single adjustable dampers, and I believe both are a twin-tube design. Of course, the 8610s are valved to handle much heavier springs off the shelf. Are there other important differences in construction, damping curves, etc?
    ~1992 240SX, SR20/Koni track day car
    ~2016 M3, daily driver

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    • #3
      Very interesting. Since the compression is preset on the SA 8610s (obviously), what range of spring rates should work best on this damper? IIRC, you want more rebound and less compression damping as you increase spring rates.
      ~1992 240SX, SR20/Koni track day car
      ~2016 M3, daily driver

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      • #4
        Compression is typically set based on unsprung mass and motion ratio. Rebound on the other hand controls more of the oscillation of the spring. This is largely why you don't necessarily need to change compression when rebound is changed. You have not changed any mass, but you have increased the amount of force the spring will pop back once compressed (on rebound). At least this is the easiest way i can think of to explain it=) The 8610 should handle a 650-700ish lb spring. I say "ish" because certain individuals prefer more or less rebound depending on the given situation and driving style. They will handle more than this if revalved as well.
        Between rides...unless you count a WD21...

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