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correct tie rod angle ?

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  • correct tie rod angle ?

    Just wondering if anyone has used this to correct the bumpsteer. Also if your drifting for the angle the wheels can go. Just kinda looking for advice good idea or bad idea discussion. http://www.gtfactory.jp/cms/page.php?15

  • #2
    I think that the drastic verticle angle between the LCA ball joint and the tie rod ball joint is going to have some negative effects. If they made something like that but relocated the LCA ball joint as well, and had an actual engineer ensure that it was safe, then it would be much better.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Duffman View Post
      I think that the drastic verticle angle between the LCA ball joint and the tie rod ball joint is going to have some negative effects. If they made something like that but relocated the LCA ball joint as well, and had an actual engineer ensure that it was safe, then it would be much better.
      Well, there have been 2 guys in the USA testing those things out for quite a few months now, and they hit every drift event they could.

      The green S14 belongs to a guy named Matt, and he placed 1st in the ProAm event at the same venue as that Red Bull world series of drifting or whatever the hell it's called, so it can't be that bad of a product.

      I mean, if it was bad, I'm sure something would have broke already, or the car would be impossible to drive if it was bad.

      I'm sure it could be improved upon in the design, but so far, I don't think anyone has been held back by this product, nor has it grenaded from the stresses of drifting.
      http://sosideways.wordpress.com/

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      • #4
        I'm sure they're great for drifting, due to the extra angle. For fixing bump steer and improving handling, I am not a believer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Duffman View Post
          I'm sure they're great for drifting, due to the extra angle. For fixing bump steer and improving handling, I am not a believer.
          Why not bump steer?

          It basically does what the extra long shank on one of those heim joint tie rod end does, except instead of having the extra long shank, you're welding a bracket onto the stock knuckle.

          If you looked at the pics a little closer from the link in the first post, you'd see that the tie rods are now parallel with the FLCAs up until the FLCAs bend upward.
          http://sosideways.wordpress.com/

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          • #6
            Bump steer is more than just the angle of the tie rod. And comparing it to the LCA before it bends is pointless. The only angles that matter are between pivot points.

            The problem here is that the LCA and tie rod pivot points are now pretty far apart vertically. If you lower the car enough to make this thing bring the tie rods back to level, then the LCA is angled upwards which causes bump steer on it's own. The quicker steering ratio only increases it.



            See the angle? Think of a side ways "v"

            >

            And then think of that symbol rotated upwards few degrees. The top end point is now closer horizontally than the bottom one.

            I think it would be interesting if someone actually measured the effects on a toe gauge. It might be better than a stock ball joint, it might be worse. Personally, I'm thinking of going with this:

            http://www.unbalancedengineering.com/Nissan/

            Sentra ball joints and S13 balljoints supposedly are the same part. The downside is you cannot go with thicker S14 inner tie rods.

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            • #7
              If you want to really fix bump steer you have to move not only the outer tie rod pivot point, but also the LCA ball joint pivot point. Bump steer has to do with the relationship between the LCA and the tie rod arcs. changing one without changing the other will likely get you nowhere. I would like to see somebody play with the tie rod pivot point and use a bumpsteer guage to see if it actually does help bumpsteer.
              function > form
              1990 240sx fastback: IN PROGRESS

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              • #8
                I thought the thing we are looking for is a parallel LCA and tie rod end when set at neutral to get it close, or closer than factory. Than use shims on the outer tie rod end mounting point to correct it further?

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                • #9
                  If the tie rod isn't at the same height inboard and outboard as the LCA then you aren't going to want it to be parallel to the LCA, it is supposed to point toward the IC.
                  -Ryan

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