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nuts for s14 diff cover

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  • nuts for s14 diff cover

    This might be a dumb question but does anyone know the thread of the two studs on the s14 diff cover? I got the diff cover to do an s14 subframe swap but it didn't include the nuts. I tried Home Depot and an M14 seemed to fit but the standard thread was too coarse and they didn't carry anything finer. I'm guessing it's an M14-1.5, anyone know for sure? Thanks!

  • #2
    I'm almost positive it's M14 x 1.5 mm. It'll be JIS, and it's kinda tight in there, so I'm not sure if a DIN M14 nut will be too big.
    '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


    DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
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    • #3
      Awesome, thank you. McMaster doesn't seem to carry JIS nuts that big so I'll try my luck with DINs. Worst comes to worst I'll take a grinder to them to make it work until I can get the proper ones.

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      • #4
        Have you looked at what new ones cost from Nissan? Or maybe a junkyard trip to "liberate" a few? Pretty much any mid-late 90's RWD Nissan will have them.
        '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


        DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
        http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Def View Post
          Have you looked at what new ones cost from Nissan? Or maybe a junkyard trip to "liberate" a few? Pretty much any mid-late 90's RWD Nissan will have them.
          I'm planning to bring democracy to the junkyard once I have the time, unfortunately I don't live too close to any. I want to get something on there for the time being just to make sure I don't somehow drop the differential on my face when I put all this stuff back in the car.

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          • #6
            Sorry to bump this again but I don't want to make another new thread for one question..

            First things first, the M14-1.5 nuts were perfect. I have the whole subframe out of the car so getting them on was no issue, we'll see how things work out once I actually put it in the car though. On that note..

            The guy I bought the subframe appears to have had it powdercoated an interesting shade of green:



            I was hoping to put it in as is to get the car back on the road for summer then deal with cleaning it up and spraying it black over the winter, but I'm kind of concerned that he powdercoated over everything including the diff bushings and inside the bushing sleeves. I don't know if this creates any problem for diff bushings (aside from the fact that I assume it'll all crack off immediately when the diff starts vibrating), but I think the thick powdercoat is making it pretty hard to get the subframe bushings in.

            My question is are the solid bushings supposed to be a tight press fit regardless, or is it the powdercoat causing my problems? I did a search and it sounds like they're usually pretty loose. I've had the bushings sitting in the freezer for a few days. I could probably hammer them in and scrape off all the powdercoat in the process, but if it needs to come out of there I'd rather just make life easy and wire wheel it off first. They are s13->s14 conversion bushings so I need to get them in lined up right. Any tips?

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            • #7
              I'd clean out the pockets. The bushings were meant to be installed as it came from the factory.

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              • #8
                Wire wheel the gunk off and then coat them with anti seize or some other rust preventative stuff. Dad said his bushings required pressing in when he did the conversion on his s13..
                Originally posted by SoSideways
                I don't care what color they are as long as they are LONG AND HARD.
                '04 G35 Sedan 6MT- The DD
                '96 240SX- The Track Toy

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                • #9
                  I did a google about removing powdercoat and the wire wheel wasn't recommended so I went the chemical stripper route then went over it with some steel wool and they cleaned up rather nicely. I see why a wire wheel isn't recommended, once the coating starts coming off it would gunk up the wheel pretty quickly.

                  Of course now that I've got the powder coat off I can see the extent of the damage the previous owner did to the bushing cups taking out the stock bushings. All of them have considerable damage. It looks like he went the hack saw route and sawed right through the bushing sleeve into the subframe itself.. on every single pocket. It's mostly pretty light surface scarring but the raised metal around the cuts will make pressing the bushings in a nightmare, not to mention probably damage them in the process. I'm going to try to smooth everything down lightly with a dremel to clean them up.

                  All of that said, I checked to see if the bushings fit any better without the powdercoat in there and it's definitely still a press fit as Matt93SE pointed out. The soonest I can get to the machine shop is Monday (have to press in a new wheel bearing while I'm at it) so that's the end of it for this weekend. Let's hope I can get it right the first time so this project doesn't get delayed anymore than it has already.

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                  • #10
                    Just make sure there's enough meat on the bushing cups that you're not going to split them open on the press fit due to PO's exuberant hack saw antics.

                    If the wall is thin on the cups, you could always get it MIG'd over then shape it with a Dremel or sanding wheel to at least give it some strength back there.


                    You can pull in aluminum bushings by tossing them in a freezer then using some threaded rod and some bar stock with a hole drilled in it as well as some c-clamps for additional persuassion. My SPL bushings were kinda unnecessarily tight, but I'm sure they just made them big to deal with the natural variance on the factory parts which didn't need to have a super tight tolerance.
                    '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


                    DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
                    http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Def View Post
                      Just make sure there's enough meat on the bushing cups that you're not going to split them open on the press fit due to PO's exuberant hack saw antics.

                      If the wall is thin on the cups, you could always get it MIG'd over then shape it with a Dremel or sanding wheel to at least give it some strength back there.


                      You can pull in aluminum bushings by tossing them in a freezer then using some threaded rod and some bar stock with a hole drilled in it as well as some c-clamps for additional persuassion. My SPL bushings were kinda unnecessarily tight, but I'm sure they just made them big to deal with the natural variance on the factory parts which didn't need to have a super tight tolerance.
                      It doesn't look too bad yet, but I'll get a better idea tomorrow when I have time to clean it up a bit. If it does look too far gone then I'll take your advice and have it strengthened. I'll give the rod + bar stock a go too, thanks for the tips.

                      I took some pictures of the bearing cups. Some look pretty typical of a hack saw graze after cutting through the stock bearing sleeve, others are more general scoring like this:



                      You can clearly see the recessed scoring where the steel wool didn't take out all the powder coating. Above the scoring the excess metal is protruding outward. To the left, the long straight mark I believe is probably from a hack saw. I'm not really sure what the situation with this subframe was before I bought it, but it definitely had not been installed as the powder coat in the bushing cups was still untouched. It seems someone did a half hearted job on it then abandoned the project. For better or worse it's in my hands now and will be salvaged to live on in another car.

                      Thank you for all the help so far! I thought this would be a breeze as I've messed with the suspension so much on this car already, but it's turning into quite a learning experience.

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                      • #12
                        from what I can see in the picture, and imho, that doesn't look like anything to be concerned about at all.

                        you should be able to get those bushings in without going to a shop - freezing the bushings and threaded rod with big beefy washers on one end as Def said should do it.

                        you can also put the money you'd spend on a shop doing it and buy either a big vise or a press. I really don't like promoting harbor freight ("only the rich can afford cheap tools") but their press is pretty fool-proof.
                        you can always hit up craigslist, too, and probably get a good tool for the same price a shop would charge you and then you never have to wonder how you're going to press something again.

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                        • #13
                          Glad to hear that!

                          I'm going to try the threaded rod plan today after I clean up the cups. If that doesn't pan out I have access to a machine shop at work so no need to spend money.

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                          • #14
                            Progress report in case anyone is interested..

                            I cleaned up the cups this morning with a small grinding wheel on the dremel. It ended up being pretty easy work, they weren't in too bad of shape. After that I picked up some 3/16" bar stock and 1/2" threaded rod. Standing in home depot the 3/16" stock looked pretty beefy and thoughts of bushings easily slipping into their cups ran through my head. That isn't quite how things turned out however. After some fun with power tools (I live in an apartment complex and I'm quite sure everyone here hates me) I clamped my new tool onto a bushing and gave it the beans until the bar stock on top began buckling down into the cup. Oops.

                            I redoubled my efforts by doubling up the bar stock but it was still very tough going. Around this time I remembered Def's talk of C clamps and clamped one on there to aid the threaded rod. Alternating between tightening the clamp and the bushing "puller" got the job done (with quite a bit of effort). I assume the offset hole in the bushing was putting a lot of my effort to waste and getting a C clamp onto the other side evened things out a bit.

                            At this point I've only put in one bushing as I'm afraid to press the rest in without being sure the orientation is correct. For the time being I've jacked the subframe up to the chassis, and I plan to start all the bushings into their cups properly oriented then pull it back down and finish pressing them in. If anyone has a better idea please let me know.

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                            • #15
                              I think my SPL's had a line running through them to mark the offset axis. I just ran a string across my bushing cups and aligned them to that then pressed/pulled them in. How did you align the first one? I'm betting it's off quite a bit unless you had a good reference mark to go by.
                              '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


                              DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
                              http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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