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  • GK Tech RLCA

    What do you think?

    One of the only geometrically correct, and the ONLY adjustable LCA that doesn't suffer from REIB (rod end in bending) for S/R-chassis Nissans just blew up on my screen and it's only a little over a week until the prototypes are ready for LUKE FINK, Simon Michelmore, Kelly Wong and Jake DriftSquid Jones get to test these sets out. Sorry to our NZ sponsored driver Bradley Lauder, we forgot to machine up enough sets for you but we'll get you yours ASAP.

    -15mm through to +15mm track adjustment on each side via a number of shims (5 different thicknesses in total) and featured with QA1 high misalignment rod ends, RC correction up to 25mm's and all CNC machined, CNC tube notched and CNC welded.

    Pre buy to start once the testing is complete at an estimated price of around $299-$329/pair (exact pre buy price TBC)

    What do we mean by geometrically correct? Have a look at a few rear LCA designs on the market that adjust via a rose joint and have a look at the angle the rose joint is coming out, it is not coming out perpendicular to the center of the car. As such, when you extend the rose joint out your wheel floats further and further back into the wheel well (aka fender). Our design also doesn't suffer from REIB (rod end in bending).

  • #2
    No REIB, but you still have two small bolts in single-shear to hold the ball joint on. Not much better...
    Originally posted by SoSideways
    I don't care what color they are as long as they are LONG AND HARD.
    '04 G35 Sedan 6MT- The DD
    '96 240SX- The Track Toy

    Comment


    • #3
      I thought that was strange, but figured you guys would know better.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would have used a dowel pin or two to locate it personally. Maybe shoulder bolts if space was tight.
        '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


        DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
        http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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        • #5
          When would there be any real force on those bolts though?

          I don't see any reason for rear adjustable ball joints. Lowering the ball joint on a lowered S-car just seems like it would give us more camber gain when we need less.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by logr View Post
            When would there be any real force on those bolts though?

            I don't see any reason for rear adjustable ball joints. Lowering the ball joint on a lowered S-car just seems like it would give us more camber gain when we need less.
            When you brake or accelerate the rear lower ball joint experiences a large forward/aft force. With the ball joint mounted like that, that force is trying to shear the bolts, which is generally a horrible loading condition on a fully threaded bolt. The thread roots act as the worst geometry stress risers possible (i.e. a sharp notch aligned with the direction of the stress).
            '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


            DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
            http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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            • #7
              Forgot about braking/accel forces so I can see those being an issue. Those bolts look very long so if they go in far enough to have the unthreaded part of the bolt being used as the shear wouldn't that be relatively strong for what they are being used for?

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              • #8
                They'll probably be fine. The problem with bolts loaded like this is the threads acting as a stress riser. Loading it to just 20-30% its breaking strength in that configuration over and over will eventually lead to a fatigue failure given enough loading cycles. So it's definitely not a case of, "well if it works the first time I'm good to go." As ever cycle is taking away a finite amount of life from the part.
                '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


                DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
                http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

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                • #9
                  Are those bolts even designed to take shearload, or are they designed to create friction between the clamped surfaces? The same way wheels are bolted to the hub.

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                  • #10
                    Wheels bolted to a hub create a clamp load. That's why they're hubcentric - the hub locates them and takes the load.

                    The frictional force probably isn't that large compared to the shear load, as metal to metal friction isn't all that high.
                    '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


                    DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
                    http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With rod ends connected to the inside, you can lenghten them different amounts to keep the same hub location. All you have to do is measure the center of the hub in the wheel well, in the wheel base direction, & keep the hub there when you lengthen the control arm.
                      I would never run that LCA unless it was dowel pinned.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jason M View Post
                        With rod ends connected to the inside, you can lenghten them different amounts to keep the same hub location. All you have to do is measure the center of the hub in the wheel well, in the wheel base direction, & keep the hub there when you lengthen the control arm.
                        I would never run that LCA unless it was dowel pinned.
                        How about this idea... Drop in a few holes in the LCA, maybe 1-3 thou smaller than a solid dowel pin, throw said dowel pins in liquid nitrogen for a bit, pull out, hammer them in, pop in holes of proper diameter into the spacer thing and rod end, and ta da, donions.

                        You would never have to worry about dowel movement, but the question is would that create too much stress in the LCA body?

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                        • #13
                          All things considered, it's not a HUGE load on it, but I'm thinking about the dynamic stresses on it i.e. wheel hop. I've had some hard downhill braking zones where I've locked up the rear end and wound up with wheel hop going into the turn. Those dynamic loads are what break parts.
                          (not to mention hitting the occasional curb on the track or pothole on the street)

                          Anyway, it looks like that's about a 3/8" or 10mm bolt. you could oversize that to a 12mm or 1/2" bolt w/ a shoulder on it. Recess the threads a bit farther into the mounting bracket so that the shoulder of the bolt goes through the control arm mount and effectively becomes a dowel pin.

                          It's not the best solution, but you don't have a ton of room to effectively add dowel pins to that piece.
                          Originally posted by SoSideways
                          I don't care what color they are as long as they are LONG AND HARD.
                          '04 G35 Sedan 6MT- The DD
                          '96 240SX- The Track Toy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You could do hollow dowel pins and they'd like be strong enough, but it's hard to add stuff like that after the fact to parts that weren't meant to go together with great precision.

                            The dynamic loads are a big problem yes, but I'd add that fatigue will make a load you experienced just fine hundreds of time cause a failure if it's strong enough. So it's easy to look at things and say the new bits can withstand it, but what about many years down the road in a design that puts extra stress on it?
                            '18 Chevrolet Volt - Electric fun hatch for DD duty!


                            DefSport Koni Sleeve and Spring Perch Buy!!!
                            http://www.nissanroadracing.com/showthread.php?t=5902

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I guess Matt's idea of bigger bolts would probably be better then just half-assing dowel pins in with hastily drilled holes. I'm not too interested in these atm anyway, just thought some debate would be good.

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